Example of standard of living going down the drain

Discussion in 'Free Speech Alley' started by Sourdoughman, Jun 18, 2010.

  1. Sourdoughman

    Sourdoughman TigerFan of LSU and the Tigerman

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    Between this link and the $7 a gallon link are just 2 examples of our standard of living decreasing due to the environmentalists.
    This doesn't even include Colorado switching from coal plants to natural gas.
    You may say this all seems extreme maybe it is slightly but no one can say that we
    aren't going to pay more money for energy in the future.

    Rosen: Xcel's unfair surcharge - The Denver Post

    Xcel Energy recently announced its new "two-tier" pricing structure for its residential customers during the summer months from June through September. I'm afraid most of us will shed many more than two tears when those bills start rolling in. Sugar-coating the changes, the Colorado Public Utilities Commission claims that summer electricity bills "overall" (that means on average) will go up by about 2 percent compared to last year. The trouble with averages is that you can drown in a stream with an average depth of 12 inches.

    The new pricing system is designed to discourage excessive energy use. That's not a bad idea, but a more reasonable approach would have had multiple tiers, with gradually increasing gradients. This scheme is heavily skewed in favor of lower-income households with very small apartments and no air conditioning. They'll pay less. Middle- and upper-income households, on the other hand, will be skewered by the new rates. This is Obama- style "progressive" redistribution of income by a public utility. The break point between the two tiers is a ridiculously low 500 kilowatt-hours of monthly electricity use for what Xcel calls "Residential General" service. Below that level, the charge is 4.6 cents per kilowatt-hours (kWh). Above that level, the charge per kWh nearly doubles to 9 cents.

    A radio listener put this in perspective when describing her daughter's electricity profile. She lives in a 1,000-square-foot rowhouse with a gas stove, furnace, water heater and dryer. Her electricity runs mostly the lights, TV, ceiling fan, computer and hair dryer. She has no air conditioning and still generates up to 440 kWh a month.

    I live in a 1,700-square-foot condo apartment with air conditioning. Last year, I used 1,235 kWh in July. Friends with 2,500- to 5,000-square-foot, air conditioned homes have summer kWh usage ranging from 2,500 to 4,000 kWh. Everyone will pay the same $23.02 on the first 500 kWh. In my case, the next 735 kWh would cost me $66.15 in 2010. At 4,000 kWh, it'll cost $315 for increments over 500 kWh on top of that same $23.02. In both cases, this is more than double what we paid for that increment last year.

    And this doesn't include the commodity price adjustment and other "riders," franchise fees and sales tax on your Xcel bill. Xcel explains that it's difficult to make an apples-to-apples comparison of the basic rate from last year because the pricing and allocation of additional charges has changed. OK. I'll wait and see what my actual bills look like this summer and report back in a few months. Something tells me that you and I will be nailed for considerably more than the "2 percent" increase.

    This plan was encouraged by the PUC as part of Xcel's $128 million rate increase. Instead of uniformly spreading the bill, Xcel will burden the more affluent with what amounts to a punitive air conditioning surcharge. Its justification for the sharply higher summer prices is that energy spikes associated with air conditioning use on torrid days drives up costs, and that there'll be an offsetting reduction in prices in other months when Xcel reverts to the lower, one-tier rate. I'd like to see an audit. I suspect Xcel is exaggerating the summer differential and doubt that winter savings for air conditioning users will match the summer surcharge. This also smacks of environmental correctness, taxing the comfortable while Boulder greenies revel in a pool of self-righteous sweat.

    The "riders" that drive Xcel's rate increases include the cost of emissions controls even when uneconomical. These will accelerate when the legislature's latest brainchild, House Bill 1365, takes effect, mandating that Xcel make costly capital investments to convert economical, clean Colorado coal plants to more expensive and price-volatile natural gas.

    Welcome to your New Energy Economy.
     
  2. CajunlostinCali

    CajunlostinCali Booger Eatin Moron

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    Nuclear energy. We should all get our arms around the concept that it is presently the cheapest and safest producer of energy today.
     
  3. KyleK

    KyleK Who, me? Staff Member

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    I wish I could get electricity at your top tier rate of .09. Here in TX, I pay between .11-.15. The rates here are ridiculous and have been the entire time I've lived here.
     
  4. Sourdoughman

    Sourdoughman TigerFan of LSU and the Tigerman

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    I have said this all along but the environmentalists don't want this.
    They want to send us back to the stone age!
     
  5. Sourdoughman

    Sourdoughman TigerFan of LSU and the Tigerman

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    Why is thia?
    Is it because a warmer state uses more energy than a cooler state?
    What are the reasons behind this?

    I blames the left and the environmentalists for all of this.
    They are also partly to blame for this oil disaster just like BP.
    We should not be drilling anywhere where if there is a problem we have no way to fix it!
    We should be drilling on land and in shallow water so we can fix the problem.

    We should also be using ALL Nuclear Energy for housing and ZERO oil for housing.
    Oil should be used for transportation only!
     
  6. gumborue

    gumborue Painfully Pessimistic

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    i pay .06 if i avg. not sure if its top tier or not. im in a coop (damn socialists:cuss:).
     
  7. StaceyO

    StaceyO Football Turns Me On

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    The rates in Texas are very high. We usually end up with a $500+ bill in the summer for cooling a 2800 sq. ft. house.
     
  8. gumborue

    gumborue Painfully Pessimistic

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    wow! mine's less than half that for the same size house (at 76F). i do get up to $300 in the winter though (at 68F).
     
  9. LEGACY TIGER

    LEGACY TIGER Defy Yourself

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    I used to run these types of electricity bills for a similar sized home. Now due to the economy have learned how to manage things very tightly. Last month our electricity bill was only $108.00, and I live where it gets very hot. We have upped our AC settings to 86 by day and 84 by nite, opting to use fans for addtional cooling. Also, have learned to unplug any electronics when they are not in use. You would be surprised how much, lamps, DVD players, TV's, stereo's, and some appliances run per month even when turned off. Just unplugging these items has saved us between $35-$50/month. Also, we never run the washer and dryer or stove and oven by day.
     
  10. LaSalleAve

    LaSalleAve when in doubt, mumble

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    I agree, but what are the poor witty oil companies going to do?
     

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