Gallup poll shows no bump for DNC Convention

Discussion in 'Free Speech Alley' started by islstl, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. islstl

    islstl Playoff committee is a group of great football men Staff Member

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    This of course does not bode well for the flaming liberal demoncrats.

    The Gallup poll is the official poll used in the past 50+ years for determing what "bump" the convention gave a particular party.

    http://www.gallup.com/content/?ci=12565
     
  2. crawfish

    crawfish Founding Member

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    The same poll that showed Bush leading Gore by 4%-7% going into election day in 2000?

    These polls are worthless, IMO.
     
  3. Purple Jungle

    Purple Jungle Founding Member

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    Well, as we clearly learned in 2000, an overall lead doesn't mean that much.

    What matters is who wins in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Iowa, Florida and Missouri.
     
  4. SabanFan

    SabanFan The voice of reason

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    It's called The Electoral College and it's the way America has elected presidents for 200 years. So, deal with it. Besides, if Gore had won, we'd all be wearing turbans by now.
     
  5. LOTTERY

    LOTTERY Founding Member

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    And the electoral college needs reform
     
  6. ashgeaux

    ashgeaux Founding Member

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    No it doesn't. We live in a republic, it should stay that way.
     
  7. LOTTERY

    LOTTERY Founding Member

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    We live in a democracy, which represents the people, not 500 plus electors.

    My problems with the system:
    1. More than once the popular vote has been ignored in favor of electoral college. This has led to a disinterest in voting.
    2. When a state has a close election b/w two pres. candidates, why are all votes given to winning candidate and not just a portion.
     
  8. marcmc99

    marcmc99 Founding Member

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    I don't think all votes don't have to be given to one candidate. I think this is so, someone please correct me if I'm wrong. The electoral college is good because it prevents the population centers of the Northeast and California from electing the President every 4 years. It helps give every state a voice in the election. It protects states' rights, as was originally intended by our founding fathers.
     
  9. red55

    red55 curmudgeon Staff Member

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    I tend to agree.

    1. The electoral college was important in the 18th century when it took weeks for news and voting results to travel and be collected. Also reliably tallying a popular vote counting into the millions was was physically challenging for the time. Modern mass communication and computers make a popular vote practical and efficient.

    2. Each state has different rules. Some give all votes to one candidate, while others divvy up the electoral votes in relative proportion to the popular vote. In many states, the electors are not legally obligated to vote the way the popular vote indicates, leading to influence peddling among the electors.

    The electoral system needs modernizing and a complete overhaul. Perhaps even elimination.
     
  10. ashgeaux

    ashgeaux Founding Member

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    We live in a republic, a form of democracy. We elect the people that elect the President. Your number one is just tough luck. If people don't vote that's their problem. The popular vote wasn't ignored, the popular vote has never elected a president. Second: The electors aren't forced to vote for the person that won their state, but if a Republican wins there will be Republican electors.

    If this election is as close as the last one I'm sure people will look into reforming it in a way that the number of electors is based on the each candidates percentage in the state. Doesn't mean it'll come to terms, but I'm sure it'll be looked at. That doesn't matter though, because it won't be close.
     

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