if you don't have time to make a roux.

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by snorton938, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. snorton938

    snorton938 Founding Member

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    you can start both of these dishes off with a roux but if you don't have time here are two alternate ways to thicken the sauce:

    1) shrimp etouffee: serves 4-6

    ingredients:

    1 stick butter unsalted
    2 medium onions chopped
    1 celery rib finely chopped
    3 garlic cloves minced
    1 1/2 teaspoons jalapeno pepper minced
    2 tablespoons all purpose flour
    1 14 oz can italian chopped tomatoes -- juices reserved
    1 tablespoon sweet paprika (or emerils essence)
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon black pepper
    pinch cayenne pepper or more if you like
    2 pounds medium shrimp peeled and deveined
    4 scallions chopped
    1/2 cup parsley chopped
    3 cups rice cooked

    1. in a heavy nonreactive skillet, melt the butter. add the onions and celery and cook over medium heat until translucent, about 5 minutes. 2. add garlic and jalapeno and cook for 2-3 minutes. add flour and cook, stirring constantly for 5 minutes (like a roux but vegetables have been added first....also you may want to add a little oil -- higher burn point than butter).
    3. stir in tomatoes and their juice, the paprika, salt, black pepper and cayenne. bring to a light boil, cover and cook for 5 minutes. 4. add shrimp and stir until they curl and turn pink, 2-4 minutes. stir in the scallions and parsley and serve over cooked rice. you can also substitute crawfish tails as well or mix both shrimp and crawfish.

    2) court of two sisters shrimp creole: yield 8 servings:

    ingredients:

    1 stick butter
    1 cup chopped green peppers
    1 cup chopped onions
    1 cup diced celery
    1 cup diced shallots
    2 cups canned tomatoes juices reserved
    1 cup tomato puree or 1 tablespoon tomato paste
    2 bay leaves
    3 pounds peeled and deveined shrimp
    2 ounces cornstarch
    1 pint cold water or shrimp stock
    1 ounce lemon juice
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon pepper
    1/2 teaspoon cayenne (more or less if you like)

    1. on medium to medium high heat, melt the butter and saute the peppers, onions, celery and shallots for 5 minutes. 2. add the tomatoes and tomato puree or paste and bay leaves and simmer for 15 minutes. 3. dissolve the cornstarch in cold water or shrimp stock; add to the pan and simmer for 5 minutes. 4. add the shrimp, lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste and the cayenne and simmer for 15-20 minutes more (shrimp should be done and not overcooked since temperature is at a simmer rather than a boil). serve over steamed rice or creamed potatoes.
     
  2. SabanFan

    SabanFan The voice of reason

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    If you don't have time to make a roux, cook something that doesn't require a roux. There is no substitute for a roux.
     
  3. snorton938

    snorton938 Founding Member

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    hmmmmm....very interesting reply.....how would you know or what would indicate to you that i had served you something with another thickening agent?.....very curious....would it be the texture, the flavor....what?
     
  4. SabanFan

    SabanFan The voice of reason

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    Well, for one thing, the color. Also, the cooking of the flour in a roux imparts a nutty type flavor that you cannot get with, say cornstarch or a water flour mixture. I'm referring mainly to gumbos and fricasees where a roux is a necessary ingredient. In etoufees, seafood creole dishes, etc. roux is optional and substitutes can be utilized as the preparer wishes. That's what makes cooking fun. I once had gumbo at a friends where she did not use any roux. I said her soup was very good but please don't call it gumbo.
     
  5. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    In a pinch I will eat a can of Campbell's Chicken Gumbo soup and even like it but I sure as hell don't call it gumbo.
     
  6. TwistedTiger

    TwistedTiger Founding Member

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    Roux isn't a thickening agent, there would be no need to brown the flour just to thicken a dish. Although it does change the consistancy of what you cook roux is used to flavor. If you don't have the time to make roux you might try savois(sp) ready made roux. When I saw my grandma who spoke french much more fluidly than english use it I knew it was acceptable for even a full blooded cajun to use it on occasion.
     
  7. Uncle Gus

    Uncle Gus Founding Member

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    right, Tony Chacherie & others make a good roux (sometimes called peanut butter roux) in a jar and will work out in a pinch or if you are cooking for a big number of people. I will use this if I'm doing a big batch of gumbo for our tailgating group.

    It's ALMOST as good as making your own.....
     
  8. Eauxkie Tiger

    Eauxkie Tiger Founding Member

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    If you can't make it, Kary's or Savoie's roux works great. Just stay away from the powdered instant stuff...
     
  9. G_MAN113

    G_MAN113 Founding Member

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    Make your roux ahead of time and freeze it. Many's the time I've seen my
    Mom and Grandmother do that.
     
  10. SabanFan

    SabanFan The voice of reason

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    Before Savoie's, Karys, Richard's, Pat's etc came out with store bought rouxs (that are just as good as any you can make) that's how I would spend those cold wet Jan-Feb days. Making Roux and putting it in jars. I wouldn't freeze it though. It affects the texture IMO.
     

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